Everything New is Old Again

I didn’t realize until we walked through several 5th wheel RVs that I felt as if our lives were broken down. Walking into our great big house after looking at fifth wheels was intensely depressing, and it took several hours to figure out why.

We’d only been in this house for 12 years and it seemed as if everything new was old again, and needed repair. Shingles were blowing off the roof, our high-end dishwasher was getting shabby and crabby, and the wooden fence was falling over where fence posts had rotted at the bottom, so every day I looked out the window to make sure that the fence was still standing before letting the dogs out.



All of these things we’d installed brand new, and not a year went by that we didn’t engage in a major repair or maintenance project. We weren’t derelict, it was just way too much house to keep up with.

The outside deck was rotting out as well, and every year the upper gutters sprouted trees, being so high that a normal ladder couldn’t reach them. Everywhere I looked, something was falling apart, and I realized that the warnings of buying an RV riddled with bugs and needing to be fixed was no different than being in a sticks and bricks house.

On the flip side, we’d just renovated the kitchen with new carpeting, a new countertop, a tiled backsplash, cheery yellow walls with stained pine bead-board around the bottom half, new blinds and window treatments, a new stove, a new faucet, and a new screen door.

The flat-top stove was still like new, except that it was a pain in the ass to clean, creating a big job where a small job should have been. With the hard-to-clean stove, crabby dishwasher, and slow drain that we’d moved heaven and earth trying to remedy, the “brand new kitchen” didn’t feel brand new. Even the brand new faucet had a slow drip, and the newly replaced metal screen door was bubbling out just as the old one had done, after just a few months.


To-dos were never-ending and there wasn’t a single room that didn’t need something replaced, or repaired, or repainted, or restained, or spruced up.

This house also created a ridiculous work load every time travelers passed through Atlanta, sucking the joy out of what should have been happy times. I discovered that other people who’d given up their big houses had suffered similar experiences prior to selling it all and moving in an RV. Now they were the travelers enjoying life, instead of facilitating everybody else’s travels.

You don’t realize how many things are nicking away at your joy until you sit down allow your mind to play in that gloomy region. You might wallow in a dark cloud for a brief glimpse, but there’s an unwritten rule about not sailing through all of the dark clouds at once.

It’s an intensely scary decision, giving it all up to move into an RV. We weren’t rich, and wisdom suggested that we should downsize expenses moving into retirement, not set them ablaze. Campground space rent was prohibitive if you wanted full hookups in a peaceful setting that didn’t feel like a parking lot. We currently had a gorgeous view out our back windows — trading that out for the side of somebody else’s camper seemed utterly absurd.

On the flip side, I knew that we’d regret not traveling if ten more years passed and we were still living the same lifestyle. Time was running out and there was so much that we wanted to see, so many places that we wanted to go. This was one of those pivotal moments where letting an opportunity slip by might be the biggest regret we’d face when looking back on our lives and saying: “We should have.”

* * * * *

Follow along with us as we share the full lead-in for the Big Change to full-timing in an RV, and to what lies beyond…

In the meantime, join me on a very different journey with Alien Nightmares: Screen Memories of UFO Alien Abductions. Experience my memories and dreams relating to personal experiences with extraterrestrials, along with the little-known UFO flaps from the time periods which swept me up into an extraterrestrial neverland of high strangeness.

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